Heart Disease affects millions of Americans every year, and for that reason, there are many different types of treatments. Recently, the NIH and other government agencies have been working together to advance the understanding and treatment of heart disease[i]. The types of treatment depend on the type and severity of the disease, but scientists agree that love can be good for the heart.  

Flooding the body with love hormones is excellent for the central nervous system and, by association, the heart. The feeling helps with relaxation and can help lower blood pressure. Lower blood pressure is essential to overall cardiac health because it causes less stress on the heart than high blood pressure. A study published in the Psychophysiology journal showed that blood pressure didn’t spike as much in stressful situations when participants had a loved one in the room with them[ii].

It is not just a romantic life that can improve heart health. Any close, loving relationship may positively affect cardiovascular health and heart disease. This type of social support has been shown to strengthen the immune system and lower the risk of inflammation. In 2005, the Pittsburg Common Cold studies included over 20 years of research on psychosocial factors that increase susceptibility to the common cold[iii]. The study concluded that those with more social reinforcement and more loving relationships were less likely to get sick. While this study was regarding a cold rather than heart disease, it reaffirms that loving relationships can decrease inflammation which may help lower the risk of heart disease.

Chemical attraction occurs when first attracted to someone and works within seconds[iv]. Dopamine, phenethylamine, and oxytocin are all released into the bloodstream and released into the body. These chemicals cause senses to be on alert and help encourage bonding and attachment, which helps calm people down and lead to better heart health.

The benefits of love on cardiovascular health aren’t all chemical. People are more likely to listen to their loved ones when they encourage them to go to the doctor, even if they don’t want to. Partners are also more likely to notice signs of allergies or other persistent health problems before the sufferer does.

The bottom line is love is good for the heart and can help with the symptoms of heart disease. However, it’s not the only therapy. Other therapies include artificial hearts, blood pressure monitors, heart valves, ECMO devices, etc. While EMMA International cannot help with your love life, we can help your company get regulatory approval, optimize your quality systems, or even help ensure your product is compliant with current regulations, no matter the country. Let EMMA International handle your products’ quality and regulatory compliance so your company can focus on helping those with heart disease. For more information, give EMMA International a call at 248-987-4497 or email us at info@emmainternational.com.


[i] https://newsinhealth.nih.gov/2012/02/love-your-heart

[ii] https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-heart/201403/the-kind-love-does-your-heart-good

[iii]https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7677414_The_Pittsburgh_Common_Cold_Studies_Psychosocial_predictors_of_susceptibility_to_respiratory_infectious_illness

[iv] https://www.scq.ubc.ca/is-there-a-neurochemical-basis-for-falling-in-love/

Alexis Ferrier

Alexis Ferrier

Alexis is a Technical Writer at EMMA International. She has research and development experience in both device and drug products. Additionally, Alexis has experience in quality assurance, quality control, regulatory requirements, and international compliance. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Michigan Technological University.

More Resources

Making Quality Systems Work for You

Making Quality Systems Work for You

If your QMS does not have the proper elements, personnel are not appropriately trained, or your firm does not really value the advantages of your QMS, you will likely not reap the same reward.
Customer Needs vs Requirements

Customer Needs vs Requirements

Understanding customer needs and their requirements is critical for an organization to stay in business and are often used interchangeably. Yet, they are not the same.

Ready to learn more about working with us?

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This