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The pandemic has changed quite a bit about our way of life. Despite how much has changed, kids will always be kids. No parent wants to deprive their kids of the joys of trick-or-treating, enjoying so much candy that the candy becomes the reason they feel sick instead of a novel virus. Even with the pandemic winding down and our world slowly going back to normal the need to be safe and the fear of the virus remain. There is no need to fear Halloween, so long as a few precautions are taken.

As with every year, parents should inspect their kids’ candy for anything nasty that may be lurking. The FDA has yet to approve vaccines for young children, only those 12 and older are recommended to get the vaccine[1]. While this may be of some concern to some parents with younger children there are still some helpful tips to protecting your children.

First, it is better to avoid apartment buildings and enclosed spaces. Social distance as much as possible[2]. Trick-or-treating in a neighborhood is optimal for keeping distance from others. If you live in an apartment building, try to see if you and your children can join anyone else who lives in a neighborhood. If you cannot find a neighborhood to visit do your best to avoid being jammed into an elevator with other trick-or-treaters.

Of course, just general good practices established by the FDA will also apply. Keep your hands clean by either washing your hands or using hand sanitizer often. Social distancing whenever possible is advised. Luckily Halloween is a time where it is especially easy and fun to mask up. Try incorporating a mask into the costume your child will be wearing.

Check out EMMA International’s other blogs available at www.emmainternational.com for more helpful tricks and tips regarding COVID-19.

EMMA International can help companies navigate the different rules and regulations from the FDA and other regulatory bodies regarding Covid-19 and beyond. Give us a call at 248-987-4497 or email us at info@emmainternational.com to learn more about how EMMA International can take the stress out of quality and regulatory compliance!


[1] CDC (September 2021) Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of COVID-19 Vaccines Currently Approved or Authorized in the United States Retrieved on 10/18/2021 from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/clinical-considerations/covid-19-vaccines-us.html

[2] CNN (October 2021) Is it Safe to go Trick-or-Treating This Halloween? An Expert Weighs in Retrieved on 10/18/2021 from https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/09/health/halloween-2021-safety-dr-wen-wellness/index.html

Gabe Kadoo

Gabe Kadoo

Mr. Kadoo is a Quality Engineer at EMMA International. He has experience in statistical analysis, performance improvement, quality assurance, and value stream mapping in the clinical setting. Mr. Kadoo also has experience as a clinical researcher and medical technologist. Mr. Kadoo holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology and a Master of Public Administration with a concentration in Healthcare Administration. He is also a Six Sigma Green Belt.

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